Terminology BarbaraEllinFox.com

Recently I did a presentation called “Horses for Writers” for  my local ACFW chapter.  As I prepared, I was amazed at the amount of basic  equestrian terminology require for historical fiction. Horses were used for everything and a life without an equine meant less progress, less food, less travel, and more work. Writers of contemporary fiction need to know our hooved friends as well, because horses are no longer work vehicles but companions and buddies. And Here’s Why The 2017 American Horse Council’s Economic Impact study tells us that 38,000,000, or 30.5%, of all U.S. households contain a horse enthusiast. Having a lifetime career withRead More →

riding BarbaraEllinFox.com

In 1969, before there were certifications for riding instructors, I graduated from a riding program in Maryland, certified to teach riding and train horses. The program was tough, backed by the Maryland Department of Education and the British Horse Society. In my class were students taking their final exam for fifth and sixth times. People didn’t pass on the first try. Fully Unprepared The program, Potomac Horse Center, was my first time away from home alone. And in my ignorance I signed on for a program based on eventing. Eventing is a riding sport that involves three different activities including galloping and jumping cross country.Read More →

organic BarbaraEllinFox.com

Organic Writing Organic writing is described as ‘seat of the pants’ writing where story falls out of the pen possibly leading down the dark halls of no return.  Adversaries claim the writer dives in and searches for story structure as they go. This opposes advocates of story structure, or architecture, for which the writer develops a story outline, then fills in with the words. Proponents believe this method provides a crisp clean story and wastes less time. They may be right but it has absolutely nothing to do with an organic writing life. The Definition Organic- happening or developing in a natural and continuous processRead More →

riding BarbaraEllinFox.com

When I was a kid and wanted to learn to ride, I spent hours practicing not just for a summer but year after year. I took lessons riding any horse available, went to summer camp, competed in horse shows, and read everything I could get my hands on. I practiced continuously. Then over the years I met incredible horsemen who taught me about different facets of horsemanship and the industry. I worked hard at my craft of teaching riding and training horses. It makes me smile when I think how much the horse industry is like the writing industry. Use it or Lose it  RidingRead More →